Rutgers University-New Brunswick/ Piscataway

Department of History & Department of Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies

Latinos in the History of New York City

595:312:07 & 508:392:03

Dr. A. Lauria Santiago
Contact info

Sakai course site

Goals:

This course will examine the history of Latinos in the context of New York City’s political, economic, race/ethnic, and local history since the late 1800s.  We will examine issues such as exile, migration/immigration, city politics, unions and work, urban decline/renewal, housing, poverty, national/racial identity, racial/ethnic relations and whiteness, cultural production, the “invisibility” of Latinos…all in the context of NYC history.  Student research will involve analyzing census data, newspapers and other primary source research. We will read archival documents, newspaper and magazine articles, and oral histories in order to discover how these sources are used in the research process. Will include two trips to NYC (one archival/neighborhood vist, one performance or exhibit).

This is an experimental course with material that is drawn from disparate and not frequently integrated materials. Most of the material covers the 1890s through the 1980s. About 60% of the material relates to the Puerto Rican experience in NYC and the balance is based on the experience of Dominicans, Cubans, Spaniards, Mexicans, Colombians, and others...and second, third, fourth generation Latinos of multiple national origin lines of descent. Please notice that readings will change and will be posted as we go along the semester.

After you have fufilled the course requirements you will:

Requirements:

Your participation in this class constitutes an agreement between us. I expect you to follow the guidelines presented below and I, in, turn will do my best to facilitate, in a variety of manners, a body of knowledge that is both polemical and shifting and that calls for your own interpretation and dissection.  Most important, I expect from all students a reasonable degree of enthusiasm and interest through active engagement with course materials.  You will have to complete all requirements in order to receive a grade in this course.  I expect you to come to all class sessions prepared and on time.  I will provide you with feedback on your progress and present these materials to you in a coherent and organized manner. You will have approximately 100-150 pages of readings each week.

We’ll have short assignments almost every week.  Short assignments will be graded with a plus, a check or a minus and will accumulate towards grades of A, B, or C (if they are all handed in).  The usual grade will be a check which will indicate satisfactory completion (B).  A minus indicates the absence of important components which will be specified.   Lower grades will result from missing homework items.

Participation and attendance: Your participation in class activities, including attendance, will be an important component of your final grade. I will take attendance most of the time and more than two absences will reduce your class participation grade by half of a full grade for each absence.  The short assignments that form part of the participation grade include occasional short response papers.  They should be about one page long and need not be typewritten as long as your handwriting is legible.   Occasionally we will break down into small discussion groups in order to tackle a question or designate students as discussion leaders for a session.

Class Trips: We will hold two required class trips to New York City. One for a neighbourhood and cultural institution tour the second for a performance.

Discussion Papers:  I will provide the topics for the first two of these papers.  The firtst two will be based on class readings and discussion.  These papers will need to be 6-7 pages in length and reflect your participation in class, your completion of readings, and your own analysis of materials.  They will also provide the basis for class discussion.  The third paper should reflect the results of our course work as some additional research. All papers will have to be properly footnoted and formatted according to Turabian’s Manual of StyleDo not use parenthetical citation, use footnotes.

Students are required to be familiar with departmental and University guidelines on plagiarism and the submission of written work.  Please note that stringing together fragments of notes taken from the reading materials does note constitute paper-writing!  Your papers will require analysis of relationships, not mere recitation of facts or stories.  Late papers will be penalized for each day of lateness at the rate of a grade per day.  There will be a writing tutor available in the Department of Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies.  I encourage you to take advantage of this valuable resource, it’s not only for needy papers , it’s for everyone (I use it!).  You are also required to meet with me individually to discuss your strategy for the paper assignments.

Films:  There will be weekly film showings as part of this course. Attendance is required. I’ll do my best to get these on RUTV or other network options in case we show them outside of class time.  Otherwise they’ll be on reserve at the Livingston library or dept. The movies will be drawn from this list:

Determination of Grade:

An Online Course: This course relies on our SAKAI site for access to readings, submission of work, communication, etc. Please learn how to use the system ASAP. The use of Sakai is not an optional component of the course but a vital parallel track to our class discussions and readings. You should check it once or twice a week and your email daily. The links from the web pages take you directly to the reading. If for some reason this does not work, you can access Sakai directly at sakai.rutgers.edu. Many of the readings are in PDF format. In order to read or print PDF format documents you must have Adobe's Acrobat Reader installed. In order to read documents in MS-Word format you must have MS-Word or a word processor that can import files in MS-Word format (most of them can). 

 

COURSE ORGANIZATION AND SCHEDULE:

Week 1 – Introduction: Latinos in US History

Recommended:

Documents:
Week 2 – Pan-Caribbean Anticolonial Movements in New York, 1820s-1890s: Exile, Revolution and Independence

Optional (but fascinating):

Documents:
Week 3 – The Early Communities: Spaniards, Puerto Ricans and otros, 1898-1920s

Recommended:

Documents:

Short Work:

Week 4 –Pan-Hispano New York, 1918-1948

Recomended:

Short Work:

Documents:

Week 5 – Puerto Rican Migration 1945-1960s: Sources and Controversies
Movie:
Short work:
Week 6 – Work, Unions and Economic Survival, 1950s-1970s

Recomended:

Short Work:

Documents:

Movie:

First Paper Due on Saturday March 5, Midnight. Submit via Sakai paper upload. Make sure you click OK to both requests in order to process the upload. Question will be posted here soon.

Week 7 –El Barrio and Beyond the Puerto Rican/Latino--Place, Community, Neighborhood or Ghetto?

Documents:

Movie: TBA

Week 8 –Dispersion and Communities: Morrisania, South Bronx, Chelsea, Williamsburg, East New York and the Lower East Side 1940s-1980s

Recommended:

Movie:

Week 9 – White Ethnics and Latinos
Movies:
Week 10 – Puerto Rican and Latino Politics, 1960s-1990s: Mainstream, Nationalist and Radical

Recommended:

Documents:

Short Work:

Movie:
Week 11 – Cultural production: Looking backwards and forwards from the 1970s Cultural Explosion

Documents:

Short Work (WED):

Second paper due Monday April 18th

Week 12 – Cubans and Dominicanos: From Radical Exiles to Proletarian Migrants--Washington Heights, Sunset Park

Recommended:

Short Work:

Movie:

Week 13 – New Latinos in New York, 1980s-2000: Queens

Movie:

Week 14 – New Latinos in New York, 1980s-2000: Mexican Harlem, Pan-Latino Bronx

Recomended:

Documents:
Short work:

Movie: