Rutgers University-New Brunswick
School of Arts and Sciences

Department of History
Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies

Latino History (is US History)
595:369/512:360

Version: 4.20.2020

Dr. A. Lauria Santiago 
Contact info

THE PURPOSE OF THIS COURSE:
Even before the US existed as a republic, people from "Hispanic" and Indo-America have been incorporated into life and work in the United States . Often perceived by Anglo others as members of an "alien" culture regardless of legal or generational status, Latinos have had to deal with specific forms of incorporation into US society. These forms often reference the immigration experience of Europeans, the colonial experience of Native Americans, and the highly racialized story of African Americans. In many ways Latinos have their own unique path through the American maze.  Through histories of coercion, migration, labor recruitment, family networks, religious conversion, wars of occupation, economic need, political exile, etc., millions of people from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and the rest of Latin America, have somehow become "American," while still remaining (or becoming) a racial or cultural "other" to most Anglo-Americans and the State.  This course will examine the process of departure and arrival--the forces pushing and pulling people from Latin America to the United States.  We will also examine how "Spanish," "Latins," "Hispanics," "Latinos" adjust, integrate, assimilate, resist, and adapt to the many forces that affect their lives in the US over the last century and a half, creating new ethnic, racial and local identities in the process.  By studying the experience of Latinos and Latin American immigrants with racism and discrimination, identity formation, ethnic culture, community formation, work and labor struggles, and social mobility we will map out the heterogeneous mosaic of Latin American and Caribbean diasporas in the US. The study of Latino History is a young discipline, with many gaps and grey areas. It also exists in a complex and tense dialogue (often a monologue) with "larger" Anglo-centric US history.  During the last two decades there has been a boom in research and writing in this field and we will be taking advantage of some of its products, although its fruits are still uneven.

LEARNING GOALS:

ACCESS:
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, if you have special needs that require adaptations or accommodations, please make arrangements with the Services for Students with Disabilities. If you have medical information to share with me please communicate with me as soon as possible. All discussions will remain confidential.

All students are expected to be familiar with the university's Course Attendance policy and the institutional position concerning religious observances, available here. To avoid potential absence-related penalties, students of faith should notify the instructor during the first week of classes, in writing, of anticipated absences due to religious or spiritual obligations.

REQUIREMENTS:
Your participation in this class constitutes an agreement between us. I expect you to follow the guidelines presented below and I, in, turn will do my best to facilitate, in a variety of manners, a body of knowledge that can be polemical and open to interpretation, and that requires your work to process and analyze. Most important, I expect from all students a reasonable degree of enthusiasm and interest through active engagement with course materials.  I expect you to come to all class sessions prepared and on time. I will provide you with feedback on your progress and present these materials to you in a coherent and organized manner.

Participation and attendance:  Your participation in class activities, including attendance, will be an important component of your final grade. More than two absences will reduce your class participation grade by half of a full grade for each absence. 

Weekly work: You will have short assignments almost every week.  Short assignments will be graded with a plus, a check or a minus and will accumulate towards grades of A, B, or C (if they are all handed in).  The usual grade will be a check which will indicate satisfactory completion (B).  A minus indicates the absence of important components. Lower grades will result from missing homework items. These short assignments form part of the participation grade include occasional short response papers. They should be about one page long and need not be typewritten as long as your handwriting is legible.  Occasionally we will break down into small discussion groups in order to tackle a particular question or designate students as discussion leaders for a session.

Discussion Papers:  I will provide the topics for these three papers.  They will be based on class readings and discussion.  These papers will need to be 8-10 pages in length and reflect your participation in class, your completion of readings, and your own analysis of these materials. They will also provide the basis for class discussion.  The third paper theme will be more open-ended and should reflect the results of our course work as well your own additional research. Format for papers is easy: no cover page, print your name, 1” margins, 10 or 12 pt. fonts, footnotes (not endnotes or in-text notations). All papers to the Sakai dropbox. I expect all of you to discuss your papers with me individually before AND AFTER they are completed.

Students are required to be familiar with departmental and University guidelines on plagiarism and the submission of written work.  For a general discussion of what constitutes plagiarism (you might not know how complicated this can be) see this document. For the University's Plagiarism (Academic Integrity) policies see this. If you have questions about this please do not hesitate to ask me. I take this policy very seriously.

Please note that stringing together fragments of notes taken from the reading materials does not constitute paper-writing!  Your papers will require analysis of relationships, not mere recitation of facts or stories.  Late papers will be penalized for each day of lateness at the rate of a grade per day. 

Films:  There will be a few film showings as part of this course, some of which will be at-home work. If shown outside of class time they will be on Sakai, or on reserve at the Latino & Hispanic Caribbean Studies Dept. ask our administrative Assistant for the title and view it in with our equipment.

Determination of Grade:

Online Course-Sakai and Web Materials:  The use of Sakai is not an optional and is a vital part our course. You should check it once or twice a week and your email daily. This course relies completely on SAKAI for access to readings, submission of work, communication, etc. Please learn how to use the system ASAP and ask for help if you need it. The links from the web pages take you directly to the reading. If for some reason this does not work, you can access Sakai directly at sakai.rutgers.edu. Many of the readings are in PDF format. In order to read or print PDF format documents you must have Adobe's Acrobat Reader installed. In order to read documents in MS-Word format you must have MS-Word or a word processor that can import files in MS-Word format (most of them can). 

This is a "live" syllabus--it will be updated and minor changes in readings and assignments will be posted. The headline at the top of the syllabus ("version #") indicates what version you are looking at and new items will be marked with this:http://www.sas.rutgers.edu/virtual/lhcs/lauria/new.gif

 

COURSE ORGANIZATION AND SCHEDULE:

Week 1 Introduction: What are Latinos and where do they come from? Demographics, Colonial Histories, and Research

Documents: 

Short Work: (For in-Class use, review a few ahead of time)

Week 2 Republic or Empire? Territorial Incorporation of Spanish-Speaking Peoples, 1770s to 1880s

Short work:

Documents:

Week 3 Republic or Empire: Colonial Incorporation of Spanish-Speaking Peoples, 1880-1910s

Recommended:

Useful Textbook Summary:

Documents:

Short Work:

Movie:

Week 4 The Formation of Communities: 1880s-1950s: Texas & Arizona

Pick one:

Recommended:

Movie:

Short work:

First Paper

Week 5 [10/1 & 10/3] The Formation of Communities, 1880s-1950s: California and New Mexico

Highly Recommended:

Documents:

Movie:

Homework:

Week 6 The Formation of Communities, 1900s-1960s: The Midwest

Highly Recommended:

Short Work:

Documents:

Movie:

Week 7 Mexican American Movements for Civil Rights, Power and Improvement: 1950s-1970s

Work:

Documents:

Short Work:

Movie:

Week 8 Border History: Migration, Deportation, Legality, 1900-2000

Documents:

Movies:

Short Work:

Week 9 Puerto Rican Migration History

Documents:

Short Work: For Wed, pick one:

Week 10 Puerto Ricans Communities in New York City and elsewhere, 1930s-1960s

Documents:

Movie:

Week 11 Puerto Ricans Communities in New York City and elsewhere: 1960s-2000

Short Work:

Documents:

Movies:

Second Paper

Week 12 Cubans since the 1890s

Documents:

Short work:

Movie:

Third Paper due Dec XX by Midnight

Week 13 Dominicans in the Northeast since the 1960s

Week 14 Central American, Colombian, and Mexican Immigrant Communities since the 1980s

Everyone reads this one:

Pick one of these:

Short Work:

Document:

Week 15 Latino Communities New and Old--Recent Political and Social Movements—1990s-2010
Read three of these.

Documents:

Short Work: